Becoming Part of the History of Ravens Manor House

We are fortunate to have a great reputation for quality workmanship and outstanding service, and the owners of ‘Ravens’, having already completed the internal redecoration of their home, asked if we would consider taking on the project of painting the external elevations of their home.

We specialise in internal decorations and focus on the niche of paperhanging, so after many in-depth conversations with the owners, we agreed to take on the magnificent project. However, before the project could commence we had to do some serious research, as the home was first built in 1305 and so was Grade 2 listed.

This intense period of research took three months, as we needed to discover:

  • the building structure
  • the materials used in the build
  • how they were used
  • the age of the existing paint film
  • the type of paint used
  • test to discover if it was lead-based paint
  • contact specialist paint companies for the correct paint

We knew that the property had extensive work done in 1976, so not only were we researching all the way back to the 14th century through the historical records office, but we also had to find a record of what work took place in 1976, so we could provide a plan of works.

What We Discovered
We discovered that the pink colour of the building was lime-washed. The lime-wash was used because it is a porous coating that allows the building to “breathe”. This is necessary due to the timber frame construction, and encasing the building can cause the construction to degrade.

Historically, the pink colour was created by adding pig’s blood to the lime-wash base, and though this colour is still used in some areas of the UK it is fortunately coloured differently! If the animal blood was added excessively, the iron oxide in it can compromise the lime binder’s strength, so wheat flour was used as a strength-enhancing binder.

This is why it was so crucial to find the right paint system to achieve the optimum finish our client required: if we used the original specification of lime-wash, the building would need to be repainted in just 4 years’ time, if not sooner, due to the poor durability.

Unsurprisingly, this would work out to be a very expensive option, and so we had to find something better. Conventional masonry paint was not suitable because it would seal the building.

Many Hours Later…
After many hours of researching and communicating with specialist paint manufacturers, we decided to use a company called Earthborn, who specialise in coatings for listed buildings. We chose their EcoPro Silicate Masonry Paint, due to its high mineral content that dries to a classic, durable matt finish.

The EcoPro Silicate Masonry Paint offered the breathability we were looking for, while remaining water repellent, repelling algae growth, and it promises a life span of about 15 years, which is the durability we were looking for.

The Plan of Works
The plan of works was then submitted to the owners and conservation, and finally, all parties agreed with the plan and we set a date for the project to commence! We are truly grateful for the opportunity to work on such a historic home and the chance to have our work become a permanent part of this home’s history.

If you have a project and you’re looking for a caring, detail-oriented company who will cherish the opportunity to become a part of your home’s history, don’t hesitate to get in contact with us.

ABOUT PHOTO

With all the scaffolding now dismantled and removed from site we can clearly see the end result of all our hard work in completing the project to a very high standard of finish. It’s completely stunning and totally captivating to the eye. The total time of the redecoration from start to finish of 6 months with traditional methods used only, a fantastic opportunity to undertake on such an historic building dating originally from the 14th century.

ABOUT PHOTO

With all the scaffolding now dismantled and removed from site we can clearly see the end result of all our hard work in completing the project to a very high standard of finish. It’s completely stunning and totally captivating to the eye. The total time of the redecoration from start to finish of 6 months with traditional methods used only, a fantastic opportunity to undertake on such an historic building dating originally from the 14th century.

ABOUT PHOTO

With all the scaffolding now dismantled and removed from site we can clearly see the end result of all our hard work in completing the project to a very high standard of finish. It’s completely stunning and totally captivating to the eye. The total time of the redecoration from start to finish of 6 months with traditional methods used only, a fantastic opportunity to undertake on such an historic building dating originally from the 14th century.

ABOUT PHOTO

With all the scaffolding now dismantled and removed from site we can clearly see the end result of all our hard work in completing the project to a very high standard of finish. It’s completely stunning and totally captivating to the eye. The total time of the redecoration from start to finish of 6 months with traditional methods used only, a fantastic opportunity to undertake on such an historic building dating originally from the 14th century.

ABOUT PHOTO

With all the scaffolding now dismantled and removed from site we can clearly see the end result of all our hard work in completing the project to a very high standard of finish. It’s completely stunning and totally captivating to the eye. The total time of the redecoration from start to finish of 6 months with traditional methods used only, a fantastic opportunity to undertake on such an historic building dating originally from the 14th century.

ABOUT PHOTO

With all the scaffolding now dismantled and removed from site we can clearly see the end result of all our hard work in completing the project to a very high standard of finish. It’s completely stunning and totally captivating to the eye. The total time of the redecoration from start to finish of 6 months with traditional methods used only, a fantastic opportunity to undertake on such an historic building dating originally from the 14th century.

ABOUT PHOTO

With all the scaffolding now dismantled and removed from site we can clearly see the end result of all our hard work in completing the project to a very high standard of finish. It’s completely stunning and totally captivating to the eye. The total time of the redecoration from start to finish of 6 months with traditional methods used only, a fantastic opportunity to undertake on such an historic building dating originally from the 14th century.

ABOUT PHOTO

With all the scaffolding now dismantled and removed from site we can clearly see the end result of all our hard work in completing the project to a very high standard of finish. It’s completely stunning and totally captivating to the eye. The total time of the redecoration from start to finish of 6 months with traditional methods used only, a fantastic opportunity to undertake on such an historic building dating originally from the 14th century.

ABOUT PHOTO

With all the scaffolding now dismantled and removed from site we can clearly see the end result of all our hard work in completing the project to a very high standard of finish. It’s completely stunning and totally captivating to the eye. The total time of the redecoration from start to finish of 6 months with traditional methods used only, a fantastic opportunity to undertake on such an historic building dating originally from the 14th century.

ABOUT PHOTO

With all the scaffolding now dismantled and removed from site we can clearly see the end result of all our hard work in completing the project to a very high standard of finish. It’s completely stunning and totally captivating to the eye. The total time of the redecoration from start to finish of 6 months with traditional methods used only, a fantastic opportunity to undertake on such an historic building dating originally from the 14th century.

ABOUT PHOTO

On all peaks of the exterior walls there are 14 cast stone roses, that needed attention due to weathering and algae attack.  With all the algae removed and the lines of definition enhanced to make the stones even sharper to the eye and prepared, the roses were painted to the same specification and colors of the Tudor rose (The Tudor rose was designed for the marriage Henry VII to Elizabeth of York, thus joining the houses of Lancaster (Red Rose) and York (White Rose).

ABOUT PHOTO

On all peaks of the exterior walls there are 14 cast stone roses, that needed attention due to weathering and algae attack.  With all the algae removed and the lines of definition enhanced to make the stones even sharper to the eye and prepared, the roses were painted to the same specification and colors of the Tudor rose (The Tudor rose was designed for the marriage Henry VII to Elizabeth of York, thus joining the houses of Lancaster (Red Rose) and York (White Rose).

ABOUT PHOTO

On all peaks of the exterior walls there are 14 cast stone roses, that needed attention due to weathering and algae attack.  With all the algae removed and the lines of definition enhanced to make the stones even sharper to the eye and prepared, the roses were painted to the same specification and colors of the Tudor rose (The Tudor rose was designed for the marriage Henry VII to Elizabeth of York, thus joining the houses of Lancaster (Red Rose) and York (White Rose).

ABOUT PHOTO

On all peaks of the exterior walls there are 14 cast stone roses, that needed attention due to weathering and algae attack.  With all the algae removed and the lines of definition enhanced to make the stones even sharper to the eye and prepared, the roses were painted to the same specification and colors of the Tudor rose (The Tudor rose was designed for the marriage Henry VII to Elizabeth of York, thus joining the houses of Lancaster (Red Rose) and York (White Rose).

ABOUT PHOTO

With all the scaffolding now dismantled and removed from site we can clearly see the end result of all our hard work in completing the project to a very high standard of finish. It’s completely stunning and totally captivating to the eye. The total time of the redecoration from start to finish of 6 months with traditional methods used only, a fantastic opportunity to undertake on such an historic building dating originally from the 14th century.

ABOUT PHOTO

On inspection of the cast iron guttering and cast iron rain water drainpipes, we found the black paint film to be splitting.  On further closer inspection it appears the cast iron was incorrectly prepared.  The cast iron was protected with a bitumen coating and then over-painted gloss black.  Due to the instability of the bitumen coating, being a tar-like substance and quite sticky, it is virtually impossible for any kind of paint to be able to adhere to it correctly and dry out thoroughly through its process. To enable the correct paint system to be applied, it was decided to remove and dismantle all the cast iron rain water drainpipes, but leave the actual cast iron guttering in place.  This was due to all the joints being completely corroded together, such that it would be extremely difficult to remove in sections. With the scaffolding in place, we could work safely along the lengths of the cast iron guttering and the steel guttering hangers. Removing the existing paint film by hand from the cast iron rain water drainpipes, we found several pipes were cracked, but repairable.

ABOUT PHOTO

On inspection of the cast iron guttering and cast iron rain water drainpipes, we found the black paint film to be splitting.  On further closer inspection it appears the cast iron was incorrectly prepared.  The cast iron was protected with a bitumen coating and then over-painted gloss black.  Due to the instability of the bitumen coating, being a tar-like substance and quite sticky, it is virtually impossible for any kind of paint to be able to adhere to it correctly and dry out thoroughly through its process. To enable the correct paint system to be applied, it was decided to remove and dismantle all the cast iron rain water drainpipes, but leave the actual cast iron guttering in place.  This was due to all the joints being completely corroded together, such that it would be extremely difficult to remove in sections. With the scaffolding in place, we could work safely along the lengths of the cast iron guttering and the steel guttering hangers. Removing the existing paint film by hand from the cast iron rain water drainpipes, we found several pipes were cracked, but repairable.

ABOUT PHOTO

On inspection of the cast iron guttering and cast iron rain water drainpipes, we found the black paint film to be splitting. On further closer inspection it appears the cast iron was incorrectly prepared.  The cast iron was protected with a bitumen coating and then over-painted gloss black. Due to the instability of the bitumen coating, being a tar-like substance and quite sticky, it is virtually impossible for any kind of paint to be able to adhere to it correctly and dry out thoroughly through its process. To enable the correct paint system to be applied, it was decided to remove and dismantle all the cast iron rain water drainpipes, but leave the actual cast iron guttering in place. This was due to all the joints being completely corroded together, such that it would be extremely difficult to remove in sections. With the scaffolding in place, we could work safely along the lengths of the cast iron guttering and the steel guttering hangers. Removing the existing paint film by hand from the cast iron rain water drainpipes, we found several pipes were cracked, but repairable.

ABOUT PHOTO

Original 18th century wooden windows are made from English Oak, which need to be restored as the last restoration was over 40 years ago. After researching the history and materials, we found the original windows were previously protected by linseed oil and 3 coats of solignum preserve. On closer inspection of the windows, it appeared that they were in good condition, only needing slight attention to seal the glass and re-staining, but, thankfully, there were no signs of deterioration.

ABOUT PHOTO

Original 18th century wooden windows are made from English Oak, which need to be restored as the last restoration was over 40 years ago. After researching the history and materials, we found the original windows were previously protected by linseed oil and 3 coats of solignum preserve. On closer inspection of the windows, it appeared that they were in good condition, only needing slight attention to seal the glass and re-staining, but, thankfully, there were no signs of deterioration.

ABOUT PHOTO

Original 18th century wooden windows are made from English Oak, which need to be restored as the last restoration was over 40 years ago. After researching the history and materials, we found the original windows were previously protected by linseed oil and 3 coats of solignum preserve. On closer inspection of the windows, it appeared that they were in good condition, only needing slight attention to seal the glass and re-staining, but, thankfully, there were no signs of deterioration.

ABOUT PHOTO

Original 18th century wooden windows are made from English Oak, which need to be restored as the last restoration was over 40 years ago. After researching the history and materials, we found the original windows were previously protected by linseed oil and 3 coats of solignum preserve. On closer inspection of the windows, it appeared that they were in good condition, only needing slight attention to seal the glass and re-staining, but, thankfully, there were no signs of deterioration.

ABOUT PHOTO

The white softwood windows were fitted at time of the 1976 renovations, but were poorly prepared causing the windows to deteriorate over the years, particularly the bottom of the opening windows and corners of the wooden window frames and sills.  Unfortunately, the rotten window casements were not salvageable, so we manufactured 5 new wooden replacement window openers on site out of hardwood instead of conventional softwood.

Whilst preparing the windows on site, we found not only were the wooden windows in poor condition, but the overall quality of the finish was highly variable and inadequately prepared, complete with painted-in hinges causing the opening windows to be stiff.

ABOUT PHOTO

The white softwood windows were fitted at time of the 1976 renovations, but were poorly prepared causing the windows to deteriorate over the years, particularly the bottom of the opening windows and corners of the wooden window frames and sills.  Unfortunately, the rotten window casements were not salvageable, so we manufactured 5 new wooden replacement window openers on site out of hardwood instead of conventional softwood.

Whilst preparing the windows on site, we found not only were the wooden windows in poor condition, but the overall quality of the finish was highly variable and inadequately prepared, complete with painted-in hinges causing the opening windows to be stiff.

ABOUT PHOTO

The white softwood windows were fitted at time of the 1976 renovations, but were poorly prepared causing the windows to deteriorate over the years, particularly the bottom of the opening windows and corners of the wooden window frames and sills.  Unfortunately, the rotten window casements were not salvageable, so we manufactured 5 new wooden replacement window openers on site out of hardwood instead of conventional softwood.

Whilst preparing the windows on site, we found not only were the wooden windows in poor condition, but the overall quality of the finish was highly variable and inadequately prepared, complete with painted-in hinges causing the opening windows to be stiff.

ABOUT PHOTO

Due to the storm-proof hinges being painted in and looking untidy the decision was made to see if we could obtain replacement storm-proof hinges. After many hours spent researching replacements, we managed to find what we thought were ideal replacements, but on delivery of a sample pair they turned out to be different in many ways. From the photos you can see there are two different hinges: the silver hinges (zinc plated) are the new versions and the black hinge is the original that we stripped completely back, primed and spray painted satin black. On initial viewing they look quite similar in design, but on closer inspection the overall dimensions are different, one side of the silver hinge is a different to the black hinge, including the hole positions. Looking at the hinges from the ends, you can see that the main difference is that the black hinges are offset, unlike the modern versions. The many differences with the new hinges could potentially cause the windows not to open or seal correctly, so decision was made to completely strip back every hinge.

  1. Top left – The original white gloss painted hinge
  2. Top Right – White gloss paint removed back to bare metal
  3. Bottom Left – Hinge spray painted in gray primer
  4. Bottom Right – Hinge spray painted in black satin

ABOUT PHOTO

Due to the storm-proof hinges being painted in and looking untidy the decision was made to see if we could obtain replacement storm-proof hinges. After many hours spent researching replacements, we managed to find what we thought were ideal replacements, but on delivery of a sample pair they turned out to be different in many ways. From the photos you can see there are two different hinges: the silver hinges (zinc plated) are the new versions and the black hinge is the original that we stripped completely back, primed and spray painted satin black. On initial viewing they look quite similar in design, but on closer inspection the overall dimensions are different, one side of the silver hinge is a different to the black hinge, including the hole positions. Looking at the hinges from the ends, you can see that the main difference is that the black hinges are offset, unlike the modern versions. The many differences with the new hinges could potentially cause the windows not to open or seal correctly, so decision was made to completely strip back every hinge.

ABOUT PHOTO

Due to the storm-proof hinges being painted in and looking untidy the decision was made to see if we could obtain replacement storm-proof hinges. After many hours spent researching replacements, we managed to find what we thought were ideal replacements, but on delivery of a sample pair they turned out to be different in many ways. From the photos you can see there are two different hinges: the silver hinges (zinc plated) are the new versions and the black hinge is the original that we stripped completely back, primed and spray painted satin black. On initial viewing they look quite similar in design, but on closer inspection the overall dimensions are different, one side of the silver hinge is a different to the black hinge, including the hole positions. Looking at the hinges from the ends, you can see that the main difference is that the black hinges are offset, unlike the modern versions. The many differences with the new hinges could potentially cause the windows not to open or seal correctly, so decision was made to completely strip back every hinge.

ABOUT PHOTO

To commence the redecoration of the Manor House, the building needed to be scaffolded to allow us to work on a safe platform at height and access to difficult areas

ABOUT PHOTO

To commence the redecoration of the Manor House, the building needed to be scaffolded to allow us to work on a safe platform at height and access to difficult areas

ABOUT PHOTO

To commence the redecoration of the Manor House, the building needed to be scaffolded to allow us to work on a safe platform at height and access to difficult areas

ABOUT PHOTO

With all the windows now covered and protected, the Earthborn EcoPro Silicate masonry paint system started being applied. Prior to the actual color being applied, the building was coated in Earthborn Silicate Primer (Please note: when using Silicate Primer extra care must be taken; everything within the vicinity of using the product must be covered as this product will etch into glass and other objects. Also keep cars away from the area unless well protected)

If you look closely at the photos you will see various opening windows removed and the aperture of the windows boarded or covered; this enabled us to work on the windows in the onsite garage, allowing better preparation prior to painting them. Due to the color change of the building, it was also decided to paint the windows to dark brown to BS 4800 code 08B29 oil based exterior eggshell to complement the original English Oak windows.

ABOUT PHOTO

With all the windows now covered and protected, the Earthborn EcoPro Silicate masonry paint system started being applied. Prior to the actual color being applied, the building was coated in Earthborn Silicate Primer (Please note: when using Silicate Primer extra care must be taken; everything within the vicinity of using the product must be covered as this product will etch into glass and other objects. Also keep cars away from the area unless well protected)

If you look closely at the photos you will see various opening windows removed and the aperture of the windows boarded or covered; this enabled us to work on the windows in the onsite garage, allowing better preparation prior to painting them. Due to the color change of the building, it was also decided to paint the windows to dark brown to BS 4800 code 08B29 oil based exterior eggshell to complement the original English Oak windows.

ABOUT PHOTO

With all the windows now covered and protected, the Earthborn EcoPro Silicate masonry paint system started being applied. Prior to the actual color being applied, the building was coated in Earthborn Silicate Primer (Please note: when using Silicate Primer extra care must be taken; everything within the vicinity of using the product must be covered as this product will etch into glass and other objects. Also keep cars away from the area unless well protected)

If you look closely at the photos you will see various opening windows removed and the aperture of the windows boarded or covered; this enabled us to work on the windows in the onsite garage, allowing better preparation prior to painting them. Due to the color change of the building, it was also decided to paint the windows to dark brown to BS 4800 code 08B29 oil based exterior eggshell to complement the original English Oak windows

ABOUT PHOTO

The three photos show the rendered designs of texture through the centuries as different parts of the building were added. Rendering, when applied to the construction or renovation of buildings, refers to the application of cement to external and/or internal brick or concrete walls to achieve a smooth or deliberately textured surface.

ABOUT PHOTO

The three photos show the rendered designs of texture through the centuries as different parts of the building were added. Rendering, when applied to the construction or renovation of buildings, refers to the application of cement to external and/or internal brick or concrete walls to achieve a smooth or deliberately textured surface.

ABOUT PHOTO

The three photos show the rendered designs of texture through the centuries as different parts of the building were added. Rendering, when applied to the construction or renovation of buildings, refers to the application of cement to external and/or internal brick or concrete walls to achieve a smooth or deliberately textured surface.

About Photo

The two octagonal chimney stacks were built between 1540-1560 during the reigns of either Edward VI, Mary or Elizabeth I

About Photo

WBR stands for “WB Regan” who was the owner of Ravens and the Chairman of Globe construction who undertook the project of the complete restoration of Ravens in 1975, hence WBR above the entrance door

About Photo

The name ‘Ravens’ appeared from 1559 onwards, but not sure why. It’s the most unanswered question to this day.

About Photo

The only reference is the black ravens on the main entrance gate posts but the name ‘Ravens’ appeared before the gate posts were ever constructed.

About Photo

The original design 14th century

About Photo

The house design in Mid-16th Century

About Photo

The house design in Mid-17th Century

About Photo

The house design in Early 18th Century

Statistics:

200 litres of Earthborn EcoPro Silicate Masonry Paint used including the Silicate Primer,

The building received 3 coats of the Silicate Paint system to uphold the 15-year life span,

All the cast iron and steel work was completely stripped back to bare metal, repaired where necessary and prepared prior to painting along with receiving 2 coats of direct to metal black satin,

28 windows, each received 9 coats of paint – 4 internally, 5 externally,

72 storm proof hinges completely stripped back, spray painted satin black,

72 internal window fittings prepared and spray painted satin black;

and 14 stone roses, each received 2 coats of colors

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